Sunday, May 28, 2006

Perspectives and Peers 8, Interview with Mark Safranski

Note: This is a selection from Perspectives and Peers, part of tdaxp's SummerBlog '06

Mark Safranski is a trained historian, mentioned in Blueprint for Action and other books. He's also a close blogfriend of tdaxp, running the phenominal ZenPundit. On top of all of that he is a professional educator, and agreed to be interviewed for this project.

Thanks Mark!

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Perspectives and Peers 7, Bibliography

Note: This is a selection from Perspectives and Peers, part of tdaxp's SummerBlog '06

Below is the reference list of works cited in this series.

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Friday, May 26, 2006

Perspectives and Peers 6, Conclusion

Note: This is a selection from Perspectives and Peers, part of tdaxp's SummerBlog '06



Multiple PerspectivesPeer Interaction
Books
ElkindMixedMixed
MoshmanYesMixed
MaaloufMixedMixed
In-Class Papers
Steinberg and MorrisMixedMixed
Allen et alYesMixed
von GlasersfeldYesYes
Out-of-Class Papers
DriverYesMixed
FrankYesBoth
HurshYesMixed
SchulmanYesYes
SchwartzYesYes
Interview
SubjectYesMixed

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Perspectives and Peers 5, Interview with the Subject

Note: This is a selection from Perspectives and Peers, part of tdaxp's SummerBlog '06

While the interview subject, a teacher of adolescents, strongly agreed with our course's view on multiple perspectives, peer interaction was a different matter. The original focus of the interview was the overlapping roles of rationality and metacognition. However, his words on peer interaction and multiple perspectives were so interesting that those topics become the focus of this paper. This study is especially lucky in this regard, because the interview subject's responses may be considered more spontaneous than if the interview had been structured to elicit them. For the rest of the interview, see the appendix at the end of this study.

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Wednesday, May 24, 2006

Perspectives and Peers 4, Other Articles

Note: This is a selection from Perspectives and Peers, part of tdaxp's SummerBlog '06

The trend toward more emphasis on multiple perspectives continued with the articles found elsewhere. While only one of three books was supportive of the idea, and only two of three articles downloaded off blackboard were, every relevant peer reviewed article unqualifiedly supported the value of multiple perspectives in constructing rationality. On peer interaction the out-of-class reading split down the middle, with half completely for and half somewhat against.

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Perspectives and Peers 3, Articles Assigned in Class

Note: This is a selection from Perspectives and Peers, part of tdaxp's SummerBlog '06

As with the assigned books, the assigned articles were more mixed than initially expected. Unlike the books – which were generally mixed on the value of peer interaction – at least one article was strongly supportive. Another trends is that while most of the books were mixed on the value of multiple perspectives, only one of the articles was likewise qualified. The other two were strongly supportive.

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Tuesday, May 23, 2006

Perspectives and Peers 2, Books Assigned in Class

Note: This is a selection from Perspectives and Peers, part of tdaxp's SummerBlog '06

On critical examination, the books assigned in class give a more mixed view on multiple perspectives and peer interaction than the class discussion. David Moshman (2005), as expected, comes out strongly for multiple perspectives in constructing rationality. Indeed, there is no way in his view to achieve rationality without multiple perspectives. Yet even Moshman qualifies his support for the need for equal peer interaction. The other readings, both of which were written for broad audiences, appear to be even less enthusiastic. Amin Maalouf (1993) frets about the irrational nature of peer interaction and the need to suppress multiple perspectives in some instances. Last, David Elkind (1998) sees a world fraught with parallel, where most positive and rational steps appear to be foreclosed.

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Monday, May 22, 2006

Perspectives and Peers 1, Introduction

Note: This is a selection from Perspectives and Peers, part of tdaxp's SummerBlog '06

Multiple perspectives and peer interaction are two processes that have been mentioned numerous times in class. A review of the literature (assigned books, assigned articles, and non-assigned articles), as well as an interview with a man knowledgeable of both educational psychological theory and adolescents, calls the value of peer interaction into question. The same review strongly supports the value of multiple perspectives.

This paper will discuss the views of assigned books and articles, as well the differing views of other peer reviewed articles, before delving into the interview findings. In each section, both multiple perspectives and peer interaction are discussed. Afterwards, the findings will be summarized, a conclusion will be reached, and reference list and interview question and answer sets shall be attached.

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Sunday, March 26, 2006

Final Reaction on David Moshman's Advanced Psychological Development

This reaction paper, nowhere near as good as my summary of interpretivism for scopes & methods, is a required reaction paper for David Moshman's Adolescent Psychological Development: Rationality, Morality, and Identity (2nd Edition). It was one of the three books I read for Adolescent Psychology, along with David Elkind's All Grown Up And No Place To Go and Amin Maalouf's In the Name of Identity: Violence and the Need to Belong.

I've previously turned in and posted quest sets of Moshman before, on cognitive development, identity development, and the purpose of education. The paper below focuses mostly on moral and advanced psychological development. For a taste of my take on Moshmanite reasoning, see my comment's to Mark's post The Epistemological Battlespace.

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Sunday, February 12, 2006

Review of and Questions for "In the Name of Identity" by Amin Maalouf

This weekend I read two books: Neither Shall the Sword: Conflict in the Years Ahead by Chet Richards and In the Name of Identity: Violence and the Need to Belong by Amin Maalouf. The Richards book was for fun, but Maalouf's work followed Elkind's and Moshman's in being required for my adolescent psychology class. The book is written by the Paris-based Lebanese author Amin Maalouf.

amin_maalouf_in_the_name_of_identity_md


As an aside in The Lexus and the Olive Tree, Tom Friedman mentioned that French-speaking Arabs are the least equipped to understand globalization. Yup.

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