Monday, December 03, 2007

Islam and Europe

Earlier this year, Catholicgauze posted "The United Caliphates of Europe," which he had earlier presented at the yearly meeting of the Association of American Geographers in San Francisco.



For those who messed it, another lesson in the danger of importing Islamic microsotates is from in the International Herald Tribune's "France stunned by rioters’ savagery (hat-tip to Glenn):

In retrospect, it was not a good idea to have left his pistol at home. Called to the scene of a traffic accident in the Paris suburbs last Sunday, Jean-François Illy, a regional police chief, came face to face with a mob of immigrant youths armed with baseball bats, iron bars and shotguns.

What happened next has sickened the nation. As Illy tried to reassure the gang that there would be an investigation into the deaths of two teenagers whose motorbike had just collided with a police car, he heard a voice shouting: “Somebody must pay for this. Some pigs must die tonight!”

The 43-year-old commissaire realised it was time to leave, but that was not possible: they set his car ablaze. He stood as the mob closed in on him, parrying the first few baseball bat blows with his arms. An iron bar in the face knocked him down.

“I tried to roll myself into a ball on the ground,” said Illy from his hospital bed. He was breathing with difficulty because several of his ribs had been broken and one had punctured his lung.

His bruised and bloodied face signalled a worrying new level of barbarity in the mainly Muslim banlieues, where organised gangs of rioters used guns against police in a two-day rampage of looting and burning last week.


As the European Union follows the United States in adding members to increase its labor and land, Brussells must be careful to minimize its exposure to whatever is wrong in Islamic cultures. The West Balkans and Ukraine are logical next steps for integration. Contra Secretary Miliband (hat-tip to Tom), integration of Muslim countries, such as Turkey, or states that may be Islamic by the end of the century, such as Russia, should be delayed for the time being. (Economic and business ties, of course, can expand and their natural rate.)

08:10 Posted in Europe | Permalink | Comments (19) | Tags: russia, islam, turkey

Thursday, October 11, 2007

Excellent analysis on Turkey

from the unlikely site of Daily Kos. "DHinMI"'s great article, "What's behind the Turkish threat to send troops in to Iraq is a must read.

All I can do in response is link to two posts I've published. Turkey, a gap country with some European land emphasizes the Gappish nature of the Turkish regime -- a point that comes across very eloquently in the dKos article. Likewise, "Russia, Iran, and Distraction" could easily be titled "Turkey, Iran, and Distraction," considering Turkey's attempts to placate Tehran.

19:09 Posted in Europe | Permalink | Comments (0) | Tags: turkey, daily kos

Wednesday, October 10, 2007

Turkey, a Gap country with some European land

Two articles, "Presure on Turkish PM to order Iraq invasion" (hat-tip to Thomas P.M. Barnett :: Weblog) and Rice warns against Armenia bill both point to Turkey as a country in the Islamic Gap and not one in the Core (such as America, Ukraine, India, etc.).

istanbul_bridge_md
Turkey: A Bridge from Europe to the Gap


Turkey, at this time of choice between a future in Europe (which means abandoning dreams of ancient empires, as the Germans, Hungarians, Romanians, and Greeks have already done) or a future in the Gap (which means abandoning the peace, growth, and properity of the West for generations) is making the wrong choice. Her past oppression and murder (even if it wasn't genocide) of the Armenians, and present petty war against the Kurds (which goes so far as to outlaw the letter "w") are the marks of country with the geostrateic maturity of a Serbia, at best.

We can be geostrategic friends with Turkey while recognizing that their perspective is fundamentally different from ours, as we are with Pakistan, say, or Saudi Arabia. But they are not a true ally, or even a country with an essentially friendly regime.

11:59 Posted in Europe | Permalink | Comments (6) | Tags: turkey

Friday, August 31, 2007

Smart move by the PKK

Rasheed, A. (2007). Iraq says Iran continues shelling despite protest. Reuters. August 30, 2007. Available online: http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20070830/wl_nm/iraq_iran_shelling_dc_1.

A few weeks ago, chatter from Washington hinted at airstrikes against the PKK, an anti-Turkish Kurdish group on the terror watch list, but with close ties to our friends in Iraqi Kurdistan. This tactic was designed to force our friends, the Kurdish Democratic Party and the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan, into either abandoning the fight for Turkish Kurdistan or destruction.

Instead, the PKK goes through the horns of the dilemma: last weekend, they attacked and destroyed an Iranian helicopter. This week, Iran's been shelling Iraqi Kurdistan.

This is a smart move by the PKK, which positions itself as an anti-Iranian thug organization, and a bad move by Iran, which traditionally has good relations with its ethnic minorities (though this has frayed in recent years).

Lastly, this is also a sign of our missing diplomatic surge: Iran should be helping us battle al Qaeda and connect the Middle East. This proxy war between Washington and Tehran is unfortunate, to say the least.

09:21 Posted in Iran, Iraq | Permalink | Comments (0) | Tags: kurds, pkk, turkey

Monday, April 09, 2007

Would Turkey be a Shock to the European System?

Barnett, T.P.M. 2007. Like Hanson... Thomas P.M. Barnett :: Weblog. April 8, 2007. Available online: http://www.thomaspmbarnett.com/weblog/2007/04/toms_column_this_week_6.html#comment-16630.


Not a European country?


Tom Barnett, who I admire greatly, responded to my concerns that Turkey may not belong in Europe:

Like Hanson, I think you're too observant of friction and not of force (the former being primary a function of the latter, but hardly its master). It's very seductive and seems very perceptive in historical terms (hence the appeal to historians), but it's a trap of immense proportions in terms of solid strategic thinking (live in the world you find yourself in, because these are revolutionary times).


Acutlaly, I think Tom and I are closer than that. The recent Islamism in Turkey is doubtless a response to the uncertainties of a globalizing economy, and thus come from different sources than Arab extremism. And again, I am naturally sympathetic to the Turkish cause. I've criticized German maltreatment of Turks before. But the idea of mass Turkish immigration to Europe, which is inseparable from a meaningful entry of Turkey to the European Union, is too dangerous.

Earlier, Dr. Barnett opined on a possible strike on Iran.

Back to our asynch dialogue of late: to me, attacking Iran overloads the Core on feedback, thus putting it at risk. I can't grow the Core if I split it, thus my fear.


This is the best reason for keeping Turkey out of Europe. Europe is in making national identities more fluid than they have been any time since the Dark Ages. That's not an exaggeration. The blending of German, French, and Italian peoples has not happened on this scale since Charlemagne. Europe apperas to be able to handle this, but Europe already is having problems processing Muslim immigrants. Allowing Turks to live freely in Europe would ramp up this disruptive feedback to Europe, perhaps splitting Europe off from the rest of the Core. (The concern is not that Europe would descend to a third-world country -- though the no-go zones already have --- but that Europe's attention and concerns would become centered on its unique Islam problem and not applicable to other Core-wide pursuits.)


Not a Continent for Turks?


The impact of massive Turkish immigration to Europe would far, far exceed yet another chapter in the "America acts recklessly in the Middle East" saga that Europe's been watching for decades. So how can one oppose an Iran War, out of concern for the Core's reaction, while supporting Turkish immigration to Europe? Especially when other larger and vital states, such as Ukraine, have yet to be integrated.

Wednesday, May 31, 2006

Is Islam Too Dangerous For Europe?

"Holland's latest insult to Ayaan Hirsi Ali," by Christopher Hitchens, Slate, 22 May 2006, http://www.slate.com/id/2142147/.

"Europe's Politics of Victimology," by Fleming Rose, Blueprint Magazine, 27 May 2006, http://www.realclearpolitics.com/articles/2006/05/europes_politics_of_victimolog.html/

I've criticized Europe's attitude toward immigrants before, but it is clear that the gathering nightmare of Muslims non-assimilation in Europe isn't only Europe's fault. Europe appears to be incapable of melting those who do not wish to be melted into her cultures. Here are two excerpts, both courtesy National Review's The Corner, of the Islamic Distopia in Europe:

From Christopher Hitchens:

In the two weeks since I wrote about the increasing isolation of Ayaan Hirsi Ali, the Somali-born Dutch parliamentarian, her isolation has markedly increased. Dutch courts have already required her to vacate her home as a result of her neighbors' petition to have her evicted, and she was on the verge of resigning her seat in the Dutch parliament and of requesting the right of residence in the United States. But this was not enough to satisfy her critics. A leftist news team in the Netherlands has broadcast an item about the way in which she had initially entered the country, and now the immigration minister has proposed stripping her of citizenship (and thus of her seat in parliament) as a result of the irregularities involved.

...

It will be delightful to have Ayaan Hirsi Ali in Washington. But the American Enterprise Institute, which has offered her a perch, is not the place where she is most needed. In Holland, every day, extremist imams preach intolerance and cruelty, and, when they are criticized, invoke the help of foreign embassies to bring pressure on the Dutch authorities. They face no risk of expulsion. In my youth, the action of lighting one person's cigarette with another was called—don't ask me why—a "Dutch f***." I once heard a young lady, offered a light in those terms, respond loftily by saying, "Doesn't say much for the Low Countries, does it?" No, it didn't, and neither does this mean and petty harassment of a woman who has also redefined that old expression "Dutch courage."


From Flemming Rose:

And yet the unbalanced reactions to the not-so-provocative caricatures -- loud denunciations and even death threats toward us, but very little outrage toward the people who attacked two Danish Embassies -- unmasked unpleasant realities about Europe's failed experiment with multiculturalism. It's time for the Old Continent to face facts and make some profound changes in its outlook on immigration, integration, and the coming Muslim demographic surge. After decades of appeasement and political correctness, combined with growing fear of a radical minority prepared to commit serious violence, Europe's moment of truth is here.

Europe today finds itself trapped in a posture of moral relativism that is undermining its liberal values. An unholy three-cornered alliance between Middle East dictators, radical imams who live in Europe, and Europe's traditional left wing is enabling a politics of victimology. This politics drives a culture that resists integration and adaptation, perpetuates national and religious differences, and aggravates such debilitating social ills as high immigrant crime rates and entrenched unemployment.


This has wider implications, as well. It may be unwise to admit Turkey to the EU, and anti-liberal Muslim violence is already changing the face of Europe.

03:30 Posted in Europe, Faith | Permalink | Comments (4) | Tags: islam, muslims, turkey

Thursday, February 16, 2006

Turkey-in-Europe, or Turks out of Europe?

"What Will Europe Really Do?," by Victor Davis Hanson, 14 February 2006, http://www.realclearpolitics.com/Commentary/com-2_14_06_VDH.html (from PowerLine Blog).

"Cartoons: Against Solana," by Andrew Stuttaford, The Corner, 15 February 2006, http://corner.nationalreview.com/06_02_12_corner-archive.asp#090123.

"Question for PNM Theorists," by Jeff, Caerdroia, 15 February 2006, http://www.caerdroia.org/blog/archives/2006/02/question_for_pn.html.

"Female Reporter Stoned at Turkish Cartoon Protest," by GP, Gateway Pundit, 16 February 2006, http://gatewaypundit.blogspot.com/2006/02/female-reporter-stoned-at-turkish.html (from Instapundit).

This is a hard post to write.

byzantine_and_ottoman_empires_md

It is no longer clear to me that Turkey belongs in Europe.

Read more ...

21:25 Posted in Europe | Permalink | Comments (6) | Tags: turkey

Sunday, December 12, 2004

Turkey in Europe

Turkish Premier Slams German Opposition
Deutsche Welle
December 12, 2004
http://www.dw-world.de/dw/article/0,1564,1426240,00.html

At first, a pretty typical story

Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan lashed out in a Sunday newspaper interview at Germany's conservative opposition for its drive to torpedo Turkey's EU membership bid, accusing it of populism.

"Unfortunately, the opposition in Germany seems to believe that it can make domestic politics out of our wish to join the European Union," Erdogan was quoted by the mass-market Bild am Sonntag newspaper as saying. "I consider that to be a fateful error."

EU leaders are widely expected to give the go ahead for the start of membership talks with Turkey at a crunch summit in Brussels on Thursday and Friday, but under tough conditions.

While German Chancellor Gerhard Schröder has strongly backed Turkish negotiations toward full membership in the EU, the opposition Christian Union parties reject this goal, calling for a "privileged partnership" with the predominantly Muslim country.


My first reaction? "Germany. Against the Liberation of Iraq. Against the Membership of Turkey. Against Muslims." Pretty juvenile stuff on both mine and the Fourth Reich's part, but then I read further:

The paper reported that the Christian Union parties would pass a motion in parliament Monday entitled "Do not close your eyes to the problems with Turkey."

The document lays out what the opposition views as the dangers posed by Turkey joining the EU including "rise in gangland crime, Islamist threat and terrorist danger" in Germany.


Ah, because immigration problems in Germany are indicative of problems in... Turkey? It's Germany that has the immigration problem. It's Germany that's invited thousands upon thousands of permanent "guest workers" into her borders, and gave them no way to integrate. Until very recently Germany even denied they were immigrants, or could ever be Germans.

As far as melting pots go, Germany is a nightmare version of the United States as it could-have-been. Desperate for workers, but unwilling to ever let the gaijan be "true" Germans. The problem is all on Germany's end.

Expect the best of the new Germans. Even if his name is Gurkan or Safak.

21:05 Posted in Europe, Immigration | Permalink | Comments (2) | Tags: turkey, germany