Wednesday, September 26, 2007

The Cost of the War on Drugs

An Associated Press story, 3 Charged in PC Magazine Editor's Death:

Three men have been charged with murdering a senior editor for PC World magazine in what police said was an attempt to steal marijuana that the victim's son grew in their home for medical use.

Rex Farrance, 59, the San Francisco-based magazine's senior technical editor, was shot in the chest on Jan. 9 after masked men broke into his suburban home.


Prohibition kills.

Friday, April 28, 2006

Mexico Decriminalizes Marijuana. Good.

"Mexico to Decriminalize Pot, Cocaine, and Heroin," by Noel Randewich, Reuters, 29 April 2006, http://today.reuters.co.uk/news/newsArticle.aspx?type=topNews&storyID=2006-04-29T010531Z_01_N281836_RTRUKOC_0_UK-MEXICO-DRUGS.xml.

President Fox, of the Mexican United States, isn't only repealing almost criminal laws that destroy families

Possessing marijuana, cocaine and even heroin will no longer be a crime in Mexico if they are in small amounts for personal use under new reforms passed by Congress that quickly drew U.S. criticism.

The measure given final passage 53-26 by senators in a late night session on Thursday is aimed at letting police focus on their battle against major drug dealers, and President Vicente Fox is expected to sign it into law.


mexico_md
The Mexican United States: Lands of Freedom


He's also mimicking Chief Justice John Roberts.

Read more ...

Wednesday, June 15, 2005

Conservatives for Medical Marijuana

"Medical Marijuana This AM," by Rich Brookhiser, The Corner, 15 June 2005, http://corner.nationalreview.com/05_06_12_corner-archive.asp#066200.

From the conservative Catholic "hippies" at National Review

Anyone who wants to support the Hinchey- Rohrabacher bill allowing states to permit medical use of marijuana should call his congressman (see below).

Chemotherapy, which I had in 1992, wasn't all bad. I looked very cool bald; it gave a nice grey perm when my hair came back (why couldn't it bring more hair back? can't they cut it with menoxydil?); and it did stop my unpleasant visitor.

But the nausea was not cool, and only the illegal drug worked once the legal ones had failed

John Walters says there is no medical evidence for marijuana's effects. He is a liar or an ignoramus, probably both.

Wednesday, May 04, 2005

More Persecution of Marijuana

"Marijuana Becomes Focus of Drug War: Less Emphasis on Heroin and Cocaine," by Dan Eggen, Washington Post, 4 May 2005, http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/05/03/AR2005050301638.html (from Democratic Underground).

At least they aren't investigating real crimes of hunting terrorism or anything

The focus of the drug war in the United States has shifted significantly over the past decade from hard drugs to marijuana, which now accounts for nearly half of all drug arrests nationwide, according to an analysis of federal crime statistics released yesterday.

The study of FBI data by a Washington-based think tank, the Sentencing Project, found that the proportion of heroin and cocaine cases plummeted from 55 percent of all drug arrests in 1992 to less than 30 percent 10 years later. During the same period, marijuana arrests rose from 28 percent of the total to 45 percent.


It seems to be that the only legal justification for the federal government criminalizing some drugs would be the Amendment XIII

Section 1. Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.

Section 2. Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.


A good argument might be made that a severly physically addictive drug is a de facto form of indentured servitude. But as this is a relatively loose definition, and the framers of this amendment had no problem with tobacco, the standard has to be very high

But marijuana? A non-addictive drug? One that doesn't "cause" violence like alcohol or addict users like nicotine? Why?

The answer is obvious: police puritans. There are movements actually opposed to physical pleasure. And not just opposed, but willing to use police powers to enforce their physically dreary society.

The Global War on Terror, the fight against infanticide, and civil society are all being sacrificed to make physical pleasure a crime.

Fortunately, our new Attorney General may be retooling the fight

The new statistics come amid signs of a renewed debate in political circles over the efficacy of U.S. drug policies, which have received less attention recently amid historically low crime rates and a focus on terrorism since the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. Attorney General Alberto R. Gonzales, for example, has formed a national committee to oversee prosecution of violent drug gangs and has vowed to focus more resources on the fight against methamphetamine manufacturers and other drug traffickers.


But it is not enough. Marijuana, and many other drugs, should be legalized. The current system is absurd.

Thursday, March 03, 2005

Natural and Personal Liberties

"US loses cotton fight with Brazil," BBC News, http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/business/4316671.stm, 3 March 2005 (from Free Republic).

"Senate OKs Medical-Marijuana Bills," by Steve Terrell, Media Awareness Project, http://www.mapinc.org/drugnews/v05/n349/a11.html, 3 March 2005 (from Free Republic).

Two great news stories. As the system, a long-term solution Congress put in place to help its short-term battles against protectionists, decree lower prices for consumers

A World Trade Organisation (WTO) appeals body on Thursday upheld an earlier ruling ordering the US to stop the payments to its farmers.

The organisation had found in its initial September ruling that the subsidies violated global trade rules.

Brazil said the US practice depressed world prices and hurt cotton producers both in Brazil and other countries.

The US will now have to bring its cotton subsidies, which wrongly include export credits for producers, in line with global trade rules.


While New Mexico ponders merciful treatment for the sick

one, not two, but three bills that would set up state programs to provide marijuana to patients suffering from certain serious medical conditions won overwhelming bipartisan approval from the state Senate on Wednesday.

If any of the bills makes it through the House and is signed by the governor, patients suffering conditions such as cancer, glaucoma, multiple sclerosis, certain spinal-cord damage, epilepsy and HIV-AIDS would be able to use marijuana supplied by the state Health Department.

A spokesman for Gov. Bill Richardson issued a statement that said: "For people who are living in a tremendous amount of pain as a result of life-threatening diseases, this is a treatment that they should be allowed to have."


Terrific. Two vertical controls -- the brick-wall of marijuana laws and the road-block of trade distortions, are attacked.

Tell me the WTO's protection of natural liberty doesn't help the Global War on Terrorism. A free and fair playing field means that farmers in developing countries can earn income -- not subsidies, not state-welfare, but earned money.

's slow progress in personal liberty is potentially even more important. The dream is not just partial decriminalization, but full legalization. Imagine a world where narcoterrorists cannot monopolize narcotics. Imagine the legal systems all throughout the world not subverted by narcomafias. As importantly, imagine a civil society where adults are not infantilized by statist health mullahs.

Hurrah for natural and personal liberties! Hurrah for the World Trade Organization and the Senate of the State of New Mexico!

Friday, January 28, 2005

Our Slave State

"Medical marijuana bill fails," by Brad Perriello, Associated Press, http://www.aberdeennews.com/mld/aberdeennews/news/10759565.htm, 28 January 2005.

Treat adults like adults? Have mercy on the sick? Not in South Dakota!

Marijuana should not be legalized for medical purposes in South Dakota, legislators decided Friday.

The House Health Committee voted 11-1 against a bill that would have allowed people with certain debilitating illnesses to use pot.

HB1109 would have given doctors permission to prescribe up to 5 ounces of marijuana for those who suffer from such diseases as cancer, glaucoma and AIDs, and for people with chronic pain, nausea or seizures.

Rep. Gerald Lange, D-Madison, said the bill provides a necessary alternative for patients who do not get relief from traditional medications.

"There are certain debilitating medical conditions that are rather untreatable by contemporary medical practices," said Lange, prime sponsor of the bill.

The measure would have required doctors to certify in writing that patients suffer from qualifying diseases and explain the risks and benefits of marijuana use to them. In addition, both doctors and patients would have had to register with the Health Department.


The excuse? It's because South Dakota, a state that blockaded Canada, the last state that fought to the Surpeme Court to allow 20 year olds to drink, a state courageously fights against Federal governments and its insane bantuland treaties, suddenly believes in federal supremacy

Charlie McGuigan, an assistant state attorney general, urged legislators to reject the bill. He said marijuana use would still be a federal crime if the bill became state law.


And let's not forget that South Dakota, a state which bitterly fought against seat-belt laws and federal speed limits, suddely cares about your health

Marijuana causes many adverse health effects, McGuigan said...


And let's not forget that South Dakota, where even our Republican Senator supports importing prescriptions from Canada, now cares about drug company profits

...adding that the active ingredient in marijuana is currently available in prescription form.


Remember...

It's not your tax dollars, it's the government's tax dollars
It's not your child, it's the government's child
It's not your body, it's the government's body