Thursday, August 04, 2005

SHINTARO ISHIHARA IS THE GREATEST MAN ALIVE

"Counter Culture," by Gaijinbiker, Riding Sun, 14 July 2005, http://ridingsun.blogspot.com/2005/07/counter-culture.html (from apostropher).

Tokyo Mayor Shintaro Ishihara is the greatest man alive.

He's not just the man who responds to North Korean aggression by daring them to attack. Now he insults the French.

A group of teachers and translators in Japan on Wednesday sued Tokyo's outspoken nationalist governor for allegedly calling French a "failed international language," a news report said.

Twenty-one people filed the lawsuit at the Tokyo District Court, demanding that Tokyo Gov. Shintaro Ishihara pay a total of 10.5 million yen (US$94,600) compensation for insulting the French language in remarks last October, national broadcaster NHK said. In their suit, the plaintiffs accused Ishihara of saying: "French is a failed international language because it cannot be used to count numbers."


Shintaro Ishihara rocks. I've long criticized froglandish myself.

Saturday, February 12, 2005

Why I Love Ishihara

"The Pyongyang Puzzle," by S.T. Karnick, National Review, http://nationalreview.com/karnick/karnick200502110941.asp, 11 February 2005.

Shintaro Ishihara is my kind of Japanese politician

Their action of yesterday fails to accomplish either of those things, and it isolates North Korea further from other nations. In particular, it is sure to infuriate the United States and Japan, two of the three major powers in the region. After hearing the statement by the North Korean foreign ministry, the governor of Tokyo scoffed and openly dared Pyongyang to fire a missile at Japan.


Considering NKZ's and OFK's documentation of the DPRK autogenocide, S.T. Karnick is not my kind of pundit

The U.S. must simultaneously assure Pyongyang that we have no intention whatever of bringing down their government but that if North Korea does not suspend development of nuclear weapons we will indeed bring down their government. Squaring that circle is the first great test for President Bush's second term and Rice's tenure as secretary of state. If there is an answer short of eventual war, it is by no means clear at this point what it could be.


I would rather Kill Kim and eliminate the threat of nuclear war in Greater East Asia.

And win the Korean War. Finally.

03:15 Posted in Japan | Permalink | Comments (2) | Tags: ishihara, north korea

Sunday, January 30, 2005

Ishihara and Tanaka

"Liberals in the lead," The Economist, http://www.economist.com/displaystory.cfm?story_id=3562305, 13 January 2005.

Besides sadness and aikokushin, Japan's also noted for hyper-interesting local politics


If all politics is local, then 2005 could be a big year politically for Japan. Throughout the year, 136 elections will be held in prefectures and big cities, along with more than 400 local ones in smaller towns. Local politicians have already been gaining prominence in recent years, with independent-minded governors such as Masayasu Kitagawa in Mie, Yasuo Tanaka in Nagano and Shintaro Ishihara in Tokyo grabbing headlines and upstaging national politicians and officials. If these trends continue in 2005, that will be a good indicator of the prospects for reform.


The article drones on and is not all that interesting, but the mentioning of distinctly-Japanese-rightist Ishihara and distinctly-Japanese-leftist was nice. The best introduction to these two monumental figures, both of whom have a shot at becoming Prime Minister, is found in Japan Unbound. From a press release:

Nathan profiles several leaders in culture and politics. We meet Yoshinori Kobayashi, a demagogue and ultranationalist cartoonist. His series called The Arrogant-ism Proclamations, informed by the notion that arrogance is the only antidote powerful enough to rouse Japan from its subservience to foreign ideologies and foreign interests, has sold more than twenty million volumes. Politicians like Shintaro Ishihara, the governor of Tokyo and the country's most powerful nationalist, and Yasuo Tanaka, hero and champion of the burgeoning Japanese left, are also featured.


In the book, Ishihara is a politician the American Right could love. Proudly patriotic and a defender of Taiwan's interests, he's also a "can-do" Governor of Japan's largest prefecture. Yasuo is a polar opposite, comfortable with stuffed animals and schoolchildren. He leads a prefecture laden with debt from the Nagano Olympics.

What will Japan's future hold? I have no idea. But with great work like Japan Unbound in the bookosphere, and The Economist's reporting, we will know in time.