« Redefining the Gap 12, Bibliography | HomePage | Redefining the Gap 13, Appendix: Computer Code »

Friday, May 19, 20061148040040

Chinese Breakfast Cereals

Today was a day of rest. Instead of seeing the Forbidden City, the Heavenly Temple, or even the Great Wall, I read a good book and recuperated from the choking pollution of Beijing. So instead of the broad coverage tdaxp fans are used to, an in-depth report on eating cereal.



Here... we... go!


At Walmart, I purchased three Chinese-packaged cereals: Trix, Milk & Egg Stars, and Cheerios. Trix was in homage to tdaxp-reviewer Rob, whose love of children's cereal is well known. Milk & Egg Stars was my bit or morning exploration. Cheerios was the old-reliable, in case of disaster.

I began with Trix, and was immediately surprised that the box is composed of smaller packages. Each is large enough for one serving. This initially surprised me, as it limits the amount of delicious Trix a hungry eater can have at once, but if Trix is being eaten largely as a dry snack it makes sense.



Trix may or may not be just for kids, but it certainly is delicious. It is surprisingly edible with chopsticks...



... but a spoon proved the most productive method of consumption. Happily, it also came with a cartoon to amuse and bemuse me as I ate my first bowl of the morning.



Next up was Milk & Egg Stars. Like Trix, Milk & Egg Stars came in little bags. A cup of Nestle instant coffee in hand, I settled in for an authentic Chinese breakfast.



Like Trix, Milk & Egg Stars proved easily liftable with chopsticks. Now hungry from my first bowl, I also prepared a spoon to enjoy a delicious helping of this oddly sweet food.



If you ever tasted cherry bars, you know exactly what this tastes like. Mix flour, eggs, and sugar together and try to eat it for breakfast. Chinese food is rarely sweet, but when it is it goes far overboard. I eyed the rest of my bowl suspiciously...



... and opted not to continue.

Last was Cheerios, a brand I prayed would not betray me.



Like Trix and Milk & Egg Stars, Cheerios came in little packages. However, the Cheerios mini-bags were clearly larger than single serving, and the box only contained too. I poured milk, readied my utensils, and prepared to eat..



Delicious! "Cheerios" is actually multi-grain Cheerios, a solid and reliable choice for any breakfast. I had two bowls, and in the end felt quite full. As with the other foods, Cheerios was malleable with chopsticks but best eaten with spoons.

Yumm!

07:00 Posted in Beijing 2006 | Permalink | Comments (11)

Comments

My cereal of choice is multigrain cherrios with fresh blue berries and milk. Yum.

Posted by: purpleslog | Friday, May 19, 2006

Would this (www.cereality.com) work in China?

Posted by: China Law Blog | Friday, May 19, 2006

The web site of the company that stole my idea for serving cereal with chopsticks, Cereality [1], is blocked by China's great firewall.

By contrast, NRO's the Corner, which routinely calls for unilteral recognition of Taiwan, is freely available.

Ah -- the logic of tyranny combined with bureaucracy...

[1] http://www.cereality.com/
[2] http://corner.nationalreview.com/

Posted by: Dan tdaxp | Friday, May 19, 2006

This experiment is wondrous. You know my strange, meandering fascination with cereal. I tend to love it for a while, then I need a break. But I never grow weary of the shiny boxes. I'm a marketer's dream. What I recently fell in love with is Berry Lucky Charms. The box is purple, the pieces are purple, the milk turns purple, and it tastes like happiness. I'm sure it's just for a limited amount of time though. It's odd how the little things in countries are different and we never think about it. You've brought us the perfect example. I'd like more of these experiments, though I'd also like you to get healthy again and go on adventures.

Posted by: Rob | Saturday, May 20, 2006

"and it tastes like happiness"

Wow! Ad Companies get paid millions of dollars to come up with tag lines that are not nearly as good as "it tastes like happiness".

Posted by: purpleslog | Saturday, May 20, 2006

Purpleslog,

You're exactrly right. Rob is a filmmaker, and is being paid to attend a graduate program in that discipline. His writing has always been superb, and I can't wait for his next tdaxp guest post :-)

Posted by: Dan tdaxp | Saturday, May 20, 2006

Dan and purpleslog,

Thanks for the kind words. I wish I posted more but finding the time is difficult. The majority of my free time is currently spent in preproduction for our summer movie. For those of you that are curious, I have the positions of writer and Director of Photography. Being a DP means being in control of the camera positioning and lighting. My preproduction right now involves meeting with the Director and breaking down the script. That means listing every single shot and the order they will be shot in. Rarely is a film ever shot in any sort of chronological order. It's a big jigsaw puzzle. We'll be shooting our adult drama on DVCAM and also managed to assemble an adult cast. I'm excited about changing the face of the SFA film department. But I digress.

Posted by: Rob | Saturday, May 20, 2006

awww when i was in china i was mostly in small towns. I only found the trix cereal but finding real milk was VERY HARD. I couldn't find those other cereals though. Once i lived in Dalian and i heard they had a walmart but i couldn't find it. a lot of stores in Dalian are underground, meaning LITERALLY under the ground. So not so easy to find.

Posted by: Niajha | Thursday, November 22, 2007

Niajha,

The best milk in China was vacuum sealed, so it could be stored at room temperature until opened. Very convenient in a country where diary isn't used much.

Rob,

Looking forward to your new one, too!

Posted by: Dan tdaxp | Friday, November 23, 2007

Perhaps someone with more direct experience can let me know if this is just an urban legend, but it is my understanding that milk is not all that popular in China and that except for people of Manchurian or Mongolian descent, lactose intolerance is almost universal.

Posted by: Mark in Texas | Friday, November 23, 2007

Mark,

You're correct [1,2,3]. Lactose tolerance varies by population, and this is partly the result of natural selection operating on different populations in the human species.

[1] http://www.gnxp.com/MT2/archives/001681.html
[2] http://www.gnxp.com/MT2/archives/002868.html
[3] http://www.gnxp.com/MT2/archives/000447.html

Posted by: Dan tdaxp | Saturday, November 24, 2007

Post a comment